Awesome Tree House For Kids… Or You

I Found a post on Eilas Photography’s Blog and thought it was inspiring, in a different kind of way. This married couple promised their kids a tree house. So, the father, apparently a creative individual, decided to put together this amazing structure. I’m not sure how long it took to put it together, or even if they had planned a timeframe, but it looks like there was a ton of detail and thought put into it. This is not your cookie-cutter tree house!

Check out the blog for more details and pictures. There are a ton of great images on there!

Photos © 2013 eilasblog.com

Andy Warhol’s Townhouse Selling for $5.8 Million

Andy Warhol's former townhouse is on the market for $5.8 million

I recently read on Radar Online that Andy Warhol’s former apartment in New York is on sale for $5.8 million. At first I got a little bit excited because he was an artist. I always get excited about other artists. But I am not a huge fan of Andy Warhol. I don’t think that his Campbell’s soup labels and Marilyn Monroe diptych could persuade me to live in his townhouse. What do you think? Would you live in this Manhattan townhouse? If so, would you pay that much because Andy Warhol owned it at one point?

Andy Warhol's former townhouse is on the market for $5.8 million

Andy Warhol's former townhouse is on the market for $5.8 million

Andy Warhol's former townhouse is on the market for $5.8 million

Staircases From Around the World

Stair cases are fun. I’m serious, what little kid doesn’t want to play on the stairs when you go to the mall? How about the escalator? Moving stairs! Come on now. Stairs are awesome. So, I found this neat post Via edot and thought you guys would enjoy it.

edot compiled some images of staircases from around the world. Some are intriguing, yet practical and others are not so practical, but all of them are unique. Their designers deserve some credit regardless of whether or not they were actually considering the functionality.  Maybe those designs would be better displayed in a museum…

Enjoy!

Hotel Silken Puerta America

via Hotel Silken

 

Hotel Silken Puerta America in Madrid, Spain is a unique hotel designed by many artists and architects working together. The goal was to develop a “neverbeen- attempted-before project that has brought together nineteen of the top architecture and design studios in the world from thirteen different countries”.

Each level (12 stories) was designed by a different artist.

Each floor exhibits a different concept in hotel rooms.

 

Car park: Stimulus of colors by Teresa Sapey

 

Reception desk and meeting rooms by John Pawson

 

Restaurant: Latin inspiration by Christian Liaigre

 

Cocktail bar by Marc Newson

 

First floor: Sinuous lines, fluid spaces by Zaha Hadid

 

Second floor: Elegance and flexibility by Norman Foster

 

Third floor: Luxury and privacy by David Chipperfield

 

Fourth floor: An exercise in geometry by Plasma Studio

 

Fifth floor: Fashion which bedecks an interior by Victorio & Lucchino

 

Sixth floor: The luxury and comfort of simplicity by Marc Newson

 

Seventh floor: An interplay of sinuous shapes by Ron Arad

 

Eighth floor: Light in motion by Kathryn Findlay and Jason Bruges

 

Ninth floor: Boxes of colours by Richard Gluckman

 

Tenth floor: Japanese tradition by Arata Isozaki

 

Eleventh floor: Good vibrations by Javier Mariscal and Fernando Salas

 

Twelfth floor and penthouse by Jean Nouvel

 

Bring On The Digital

QR Code Pavilion in Russia
via Microsoft Tag

I had every intention of rewording the following paragraph, but there is just no way to say it better. It is perfect. So, I am quoting Elliott Lemenager from Microsoft Tag. Wow, holy QR Codes.

Get ready to have your mind blown with QR Code mania. Russia’s futuristic, QR code pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale, is a sight to behold. With every nook and cranny covered with giant qr codes, visitors can scan the QR Codes to explore plans and models for Skolkovo, a Russian city dedicated to science and technology that’s currently under development. This is one of the coolest displays of QR Codes I have ever seen but I’ll stop talking and let the images show you what it’s like.”

Private Suite On Wheels

Talk about bringing camping into the 21st century

I know a lot of people who would be overjoyed to go “camping” in something like this. Very modern. I would take this thing and tour the US… forget camping.

Regardless… this is not camping. This is just vacation. Camping is you (with family and friends), a tent, some hiking, mountain pies, no running water and a lot of bugs.

Via TheDesignerPad

 

 

 

 

 

Hobbit House

I found this article with pictures at Mail One. Amazing! I love it and wanted to share it.

Thus guy is my hero! Creative and ambitious!

Simon Dale: How I built my hobbit house in Wales for just £3,000 | Mail Online

Our £3,000 Hobbit house: The family home dug from a hillside and built with scraps scavenged from skips

Armed with only a chisel, a chainsaw and a hammer, the 32-year-old moved his family to a hillside in Wales and started digging.

The result is a wooden eco-home – constructed in four months and costing  just £3,000 or roughly $3966.00 – which would look perfectly at ease alongside the Hobbit houses in The Lord Of The Rings.

Finished article: Simon Dale's family home, made with his bare hands

Finished article: Simon Dale’s family home which he built in four months for a cost of £3,000

The moon rises on the house which is roofed with grass and nestles in its woodland surroundings

Nestled: The moon rises on the house which is roofed with grass and blends in to its woodland surroundings

Home from home: In just four months the house was ready

Cosy home: The house is heated by a wood burner and a solar panel provides power

Mr Dale, who has no experience in
carpentry or architecture, created his sustainable family home using
scrap wood for floors, materials scavenged from skips and by diverting
water from a nearby spring.

 

And while he was doing the building
work, his wife Jasmine Saville and their two toddler children camped in
the nearby countryside.

 

He said: ‘Being your own have-a-go
architect is a lot of fun and allows you to create and enjoy something
which is part of yourself and the land rather than, at worst, a
mass-produced box designed for maximum profit and the convenience of the
construction industry.

 

‘Building from natural materials does
away with producers’ profits and the cocktail of carcinogenic poisons
that fill most modern buildings.’

 

Cosy: Inside the finished house, with windows and floors as well as a staircase
Sustainable: Simon Dale, who had no experience as a carpenter or architect when he started the project, used lime plaster and wood from the surrounding area

Woodland view: The house is fully sustainable

Woodland view: Mr Dale put the timber frame up first, then the roof, so his family could be sheltered while he carried out the rest of the work

Hobbit house: The finished article sits in the Welsh hillside and is almost hidden from view

Hobbit house: The finished article sits in the Welsh hillside and is almost hidden from view

The family struck lucky searching for
a site for their dream project. In return for looking after the area,
the owner of the woods gave them their plot for free.

 

After digging into the hillside, Mr
Dale – with the help of his father-in-law, a builder – first constructed
the building’s timber frame.

 

The roof, which came next, has a
layer of straw bales for insulation and is covered  with sheets of
plastic to make it waterproof.

 

Finally it is covered with a layer of earth, which ensures the house blends perfectly into its surroundings.

Finished article: Simon Dale, with wife Jasmine Saville, outside their home, just four months after starting work

Woodland home: Simon Dale, with wife Jasmine Saville and their two children outside their home, just four months after starting work

Once the outer shell was complete, the family made an interior wall from straw bales stacked on dry-stone walling and staked together with hazel sticks.

Once the walls were up a sub-floor made from pallets was laid, with floorboards put down on top.

Miss Saville, writing on her husband’s website, said: ‘Some past experience, lots of reading and self-belief gave  us the courage of our conviction that we wanted to build our own home in natural surroundings.

‘For us, one choice led to another and each time we  took the plunge events conspired to assist us in our mission. There were times of stress and exhaustion, but  definitely no regrets and plenty of satisfaction.’

Window on the woods: The cosy sitting room looks out through the conservatory to the surrounding woodland

Window on the woods: The cosy sitting room looks out through the conservatory to the surrounding woodland

From scratch: Simon Dale building his 'hobbit house'

From scratch: Simon Dale building his ‘hobbit house’

Foundations: The house taking shape after putting palletes on top of straw bales ready for floor boards
From rubble: The beginning of the house...

Before and after:  View from the unfinished window (left) and piles of stones on the house site

Foundations: The house taking shape after putting palletes on top of straw bales ready for floor boards

Foundations: The house takes shape with palettes laid as a sub floor, ready for floor boards

Helping hand: Simon Dale's son helps out gathering wood

Helping hand: Simon Dale’s son helps out gathering wood

Family task: Simon Dale moved his family to Wales and started building

Family task: Simon Dale moved his family to Wales and started building

As well as being made from sustainable
material the Hobbit house, as it is dubbed by locals, has lime plaster
on its walls instead of cement, a compost toilet, a fridge cooled by air
from beneath the foundations and solar panels for power.

Mr Dale said: ‘This sort of  life is
about living in harmony with both the natural world and ourselves, doing
things simply and using appropriate levels of technology.’

Since building his house, Mr Dale is
following the design to construct the first home in the Lammas Village,
Wales’s first eco-development.

For more information on building low impact homes, visit www.simondale.net

Plans: Drawings for the hobbit house

Plans: Drawings for the hobbit house

Insulation: Straw, membrane and earth make up the walls

Insulation: Straw, membrane and earth make up the walls

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